Friday, September 19, 2014

Paying tribute to fallen doughboys

"American World War I cemeteries are often even more vast than the French — Meuse-Argonne, the largest American cemetery in Europe, has more than 14,000 graves — and even more beautiful than the German. They’re among the most magnificent public spaces you will ever behold; their construction was personally supervised by the same man who personally supervised the prosecution of the war in France, Gen. John Joseph Pershing. When he was done with them, the general turned his attention to war memorials and monuments, with the intention of creating order out of burgeoning chaos."

via New York Times

Thursday, September 18, 2014
The more powerful and original a mind, the more it will incline towards…solitude. Aldous Huxley 


Friday, September 12, 2014
Wednesday, September 3, 2014

design-is-fine:

Norman Foster, Philological Library at Berlin Free University, 2001-2005. Foster + Partners. Pic Source 1 + Bernd Wannenmacher + 3

Monday, September 1, 2014
Be regular and ordinary in your life, like a bourgeois, so that you may be violent and original in your work. Gustave Flaubert
Saturday, August 30, 2014
penamerican:

"My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings."
Happy Birthday, Mary Shelley!

penamerican:

"My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings."

Happy Birthday, Mary Shelley!

Friday, August 29, 2014

design-is-fine:

Tadao Ando, Shiba Ryotaro Memorial Museum, 2001. Osaka, Japan. It is the home of 20,000 books of the japanese novelist, collected during his lifetime. Photo: Alex Roman. Source

Every writer, of every political flavor, has some neat historical analogy, or mini-lesson, with which to preface an argument for why we ought to bomb these guys or side with those guys against the guys we were bombing before. But the best argument for reading history is not that it will show us the right thing to do in one case or the other, but rather that it will show us why even doing the right thing rarely works out. Adam Gopnik on the value of studying history. (via newyorker)