Saturday, August 30, 2014
penamerican:

"My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings."
Happy Birthday, Mary Shelley!

penamerican:

"My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings."

Happy Birthday, Mary Shelley!

Friday, August 29, 2014

design-is-fine:

Tadao Ando, Shiba Ryotaro Memorial Museum, 2001. Osaka, Japan. It is the home of 20,000 books of the japanese novelist, collected during his lifetime. Photo: Alex Roman. Source

Every writer, of every political flavor, has some neat historical analogy, or mini-lesson, with which to preface an argument for why we ought to bomb these guys or side with those guys against the guys we were bombing before. But the best argument for reading history is not that it will show us the right thing to do in one case or the other, but rather that it will show us why even doing the right thing rarely works out. Adam Gopnik on the value of studying history. (via newyorker)
design-is-fine:

Neil Fujita, cover artwork for Fortune, 1953. Source

design-is-fine:

Neil Fujita, cover artwork for Fortune, 1953. Source

Wednesday, August 27, 2014
A writer’s notebook is a junkyard. A junkyard of the writer’s mind. Novelist Lawrence Norfolk
Thursday, August 21, 2014
explore-blog:

James Baldwin on the creative process and the artist’s responsibility to society – absolutely spectacular read from 1962 

explore-blog:

James Baldwin on the creative process and the artist’s responsibility to societyabsolutely spectacular read from 1962 

Monday, August 11, 2014
explore-blog:

Illustrator Gemma Correll reimagines that famous Victorian map of woman’s heart into this map of the introvert’s heart.
Complement with the power of introverts, illustrated.
Monday, August 4, 2014
explore-blog:

If you read one thing today, make it Rebecca Solnit on how we find ourselves by mastering the art of getting lost.

explore-blog:

If you read one thing today, make it Rebecca Solnit on how we find ourselves by mastering the art of getting lost.

When the lights went out over Europe

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At 11 p.m. GMT 100 years ago today, Britain’s ultimatum to Germany — get out of Belgium by midnight — expired, and World War I was fully underway. 

The British immediately declared war on the Germans, the day after France and Germany had declared war on one another. 

British Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey was reported to have said the following, a phrase that still haunts after a century: 

“The lamps are going out all over Europe, we shall not see them lit again in our lifetime.”

Between 10-11 p.m. tonight in London, lights of some of the city’s most famous landmarks will be extinguished to begin the commemorations. 

For more than 4-1/2 years, the carnage claimed more than 16 million lives. Britain lost between 700,000 and 888,000 men. Nearly 1.4 million French soldiers died, as did around half a million Italians and more than 115,000 Americans. 

Russia suffered the most of any country, with between 1.7 million and 2.3 million military deaths, even though its participation ended in 1917 with the Bolshevik revolution.

On the Central Powers side, Germany suffered the heaviest losses, with 1.7 million to 2 million men killed; Austria-Hungary lost between 1.2 million to 1.5 million men in uniform; and the Ottoman Empire between 325,000 and 770,000.

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